How to say baked in Korean: Guun

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How to say baked in Korean: Guun

Learning Korean for travel or study? Let’s try this term:

To say baked in Korean: Guun
Say it out loud: “Goo Oon

You can learn how to say baked and over 220 other travel-friendly words and phrases with our inexpensive, easy-to-use Korean language cheat sheets. We can help you make your next trip to another country even more fun and immersive. Click below!

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Some more helpful words in our Korean Cooking Methods category:

baked – Guun  (Goo Oon)
boiled – Salmeun  (Sal Meun)
fried – Twigin  (Twee Gin)
grilled – Geurire Guun  (Grill E Goo Oon)
rare – Reeo  (Rare)
raw – Ikhiji Anheun  (Eek Ki Ji Ah Neun)
roasted – Roseuteu  (Roast)
sauteed – Gireume Bokkeun  (Gi Reum Eh Bo Kkeun)
spicy – Maeun  (Mae Oon)
stewed – Seutyu  (Stew)
stuffed – Chaeun  (Chae Oon)
well done – Weldeon  (Well Done)

And here’s how to say baked in other languages!

Arabic–Makhbooz  (mak booz)
Chinese–Hōng De  (Hong Duh)
Croatian–pečen  (peh chen)
Czech–pečený  (peh chen ee)
Finnish–uunissa paistettu  (oo niss sah pies teht tuh)
French–cuit au four  (kwee ah four)
German–gebacken  (geh bahk un)
Italian–al forno  (al for no)
Japanese–Yaita  (Yay Tah)
Korean–Guun  (Goo Oon)
Polish–pieczony  (pyeah tscho' nyh)
Portuguese–Ao Forno  (ah-oo fohr noo)
Russian–zapechyonnyu  (zah pee choh nyu)
Spanish–al horno  (all or no)
Swahili–kuokwa  (koo oh kwah)
Thai–Op  (awb)
Turkish–pişmiş  (pish mish)
Vietnamese–Nướng  (Nuu-Uhng)

Boiled or "baked" (Guun) potatoes? Why not try both when you visit the Korean culture? Most cultures are courteous enough to let a visitor try more than one dish. Translate more of these wonderful foods using our instant access to the Korean Language Set.

Contributor

Jung-Eun Park
Biography: Jung-Eun was born and raised in Seoul, Korea. She has a Master's degree in Translation and Localization Management and is currently working as a project manager at a translation company.
Born: Seoul, Korea
Location: Seoul, Korea

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